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coreypress: IN WORDS DROWN I One of the Ghost Traps I made a few…

by cnkguy
coreypress: IN WORDS DROWN I One of the Ghost Traps I made a few…

coreypress:

IN WORDS DROWN I
One of the Ghost Traps I made a few years ago.
The golden skull attracts the ghost’s attention, the palindrome fascinates it, and the graveyard earth gives it a place to settle.
Use it to help clear your house of minor spirits. (And I guess if you are really bad you could place one in a cemetery for a month then smash it in the home of an enemy, but that sort of thing risks backfiring.)

This is quite neat – like fly paper for spirits. 

BUT, if a ghost is smart enough to be amused or fascinated by a palindrome, that means it’s sentient and intelligent. If so, what the hell is wrong with just talking to them? Don’t trap them in bottles – say hi you fucking cowards.

(I would however use a variation of this spell if I had to transport ghosts with me to somewhere else and they needed an anchor point.)

Source: Tales of Necromancy


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"Oblivion approaches. Now I’m close enough, I open my arms."

by cnkguy
"Oblivion approaches. Now I’m close enough, I open my arms."

“Oblivion approaches. Now I’m close enough, I open my arms.”

Sylvia Plath, from a diary entry featured in “The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath,”
(via mirroir)

Source: Tales of Necromancy


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requiem-on-water: Supernatural: Purification by Melissa Smith

by cnkguy
requiem-on-water: Supernatural: Purification by Melissa Smith

requiem-on-water:

Supernatural: Purification by Melissa Smith

Source: Tales of Necromancy


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Notes for Necromancers: Or, things I have learnt this week I didn’t really want to know…

by cnkguy
Notes for Necromancers: Or, things I have learnt this week I didn’t really want to know…

In witchcraft – as in life – whilst technically the more you know the better, that doesn’t stop some knowledge being difficult or bitter. True necromancers speak with ghosts, they don’t actually raise shambling piles of bones to do their fell bidding. But there is another more mundane job that any necromancer worth their salt needs to be able to do: see death for what it is and recognise the emotions surrounding it and people’s reactions to it. (Warning: the following deals very specifically and practically with death and dying.)

– Don’t be surprised if you receive an omen the day before. It does mean exactly what you think. (Mine was a magpie who brought a crow with her and then left. The crow strutted outside the glass door and stared, curious and unafraid, at the occupant of the bed and then me until I met his eye and understood his message. Then he left; the magpie came and went but the crow never returned.)

– A death rattle is an actual thing: it’s a change in breathing when a person isn’t strong enough to clear a build up of fluid in their throat. For an ill or elderly person this usually signifies they have about ½-1h left.

– Someone who’s dying will often have half the attitude of a corpse already. Their skin will be sallow and yellow, their eyes may be only half closed, their posture and neck may be rigid, their mouth may be open and their lips drawn back. It is disquieting to see.

– They are still there. Think of them slowly packing up who they are: the organs (furniture) started first because it’s simplest. But now they’re placing memories (objects, trinkets and books) into boxes. Morphine and nostalgia mix. The longer the life, the more there is to pack in their mind until they’re ready to leave the body (house) they’re in. Close your eyes, open a box of your own and help them pack if you like.

– Life is a tenacious habit. Breathing will slow, there may be 30 seconds or more between one breath or the next, shocking some who hold vigil and thought it had ended. (To counter this, hold your fingers against their pulse as you hold their hand. Or watch the shadow-flicker of the pulse at their neck.)

– Tell them you love them. Tell them you’re there. Give them permission to move on to rest or new things. 

– It is possible to give some form of strength to ghosts etc by bolstering their spirit. In a similar process it is possible to try to hasten a death by smothering a heartbeat. (It is much much harder: giving life and strength is far easier than trying to suppress it. Also, no matter how merciful, you will likely feel guilty AF for trying.)

– People react oddly to death and vigils: try to accept it. Some may weep flamboyantly, some stand in quiet misery. Some may read scripture aloud – even if the dying person held different beliefs. Some may even take snaps of them holding their loved one’s hand and post it on Insta. (Even this last behaviour is nothing new: the Victorians often photographed their dead loved ones.) Keep your cool.

– If you believe in spirits or deities who act as psychopomps, do not be afraid to call them to help with the journey. Death can be just as laboured as birth. (On a personal note, dearest Anubis, I can never thank you enough.)

– There is a surprising amount of difference between the almost-dead and the dead. Within a few minutes of death, the skin will pale further, and fingers, toes and lips will start to take on a purple bruise-ish hue at the edges and be chill to the touch. Cheeks will hollow, and eyes (if open) will be as soulless as eggs set in aspic. There is no question about it: whatever energy, force, spark or divinity that once animated and made a body a person, is absent.

– Mourners are sentimental about corpses because they are not ready to recognise their loved one has already gone. (Whether on to change, rest or reward is open to interpretation and not important – they’re still gone.) As a necromancer, it is your job to see the truth of the matter. Acknowledge the corpse (yes, corpse) is not your loved one: it’s not them any more than their favourite item of clothing is their skin. It may take brief pain, like pulling out a splinter, but it needs to be done. I do not mean for you to be callous to other mourners – quite the opposite. Necromancers have an edge: we know we can speak to those who have gone before. (Even those who are comforted by the promises of the hereafter in religion don’t often get that.)

– Depending on what was un-done or un-said, somewhen between death and the funeral you may receive a visitation. (I did from my mother, I hope I will from my father too.) They will come when it is quiet, likely when you are alone. Pour them a drink or offer them their favourite food if you can. Don’t be scared. Take the opportunity to embrace them one last time. This personal goodbye will make weathering the public events easier: you will be able to offer comfort and humour to others at the wake or funeral; you will give the strength they lack because your loved one has already given it to you.

– Probably don’t panic if you have shivering fits or a increase/decrease of appetite or different sleeping patterns after an event like this. No matter how prepared – spiritually or logically – you are, your body may not be on quite the same page as your brain. Let it catch up.

Source: Tales of Necromancy


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salemwitchtrials: [ID: excerpt from ‘Demeter’s Prayer to Hades,’…

by cnkguy
salemwitchtrials: [ID: excerpt from ‘Demeter’s Prayer to Hades,’…

salemwitchtrials:

[ID: excerpt from ‘Demeter’s Prayer to Hades,’ a poem by Rita Dove

“There are no curses—only mirrors.”]

Source: Tales of Necromancy


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mysteriousplanchette: The frontispiece illustration for The…

by cnkguy
mysteriousplanchette: The frontispiece illustration for The…

mysteriousplanchette:

The frontispiece illustration for The Return of Frank R. Stockton, reprinted on a promotional pamphlet recently sent my way by the ever-enigmatic @ballyhooligan! This work, published in 1913, purported to be the continued writings of popular author Frank Stockton, received via automatic writing via the mediumship of Etta de Camp. The book’s subtitle kind of explains everything: “Stories and Letters Which Cannot Fail to Convince the Reader that Frank R. Stockton Still Lives and Writes through the Instrumentality of Miss Etta De Camp.” OK then!

#seance #spiritualism #automaticwriting #ghostwriter #frankrstockton #spiritscribbles #spirit #ghost #literature #illustration #bookporn
https://www.instagram.com/p/BxKWnODFp8Q/?igshid=m42rp5fv5l2c

Source: Tales of Necromancy


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