Find us on Google+

Seven Stars InnPhoenixville, PAThe Seven Stars Inn in…

by cnkguy
Seven Stars InnPhoenixville, PAThe Seven Stars Inn in…

Seven Stars Inn
Phoenixville, PA

The Seven Stars Inn in Phoenixville, PA began as the Gerhard Brumbach Tavern in 1736. Or at least the first one did. The place known as Seven Stars Inn today actually sits a mile east from the original, and was opened in 1754. Both inns are said to be haunted.

The first is haunted by the ghost of Rachel Parker, the widow of former owner Benjamin Brownback, who was murdered at the age of 85. People have seen and felt her on the stairs. The second, modern Seven Stars Inn was founded in 1754. It is haunted by the ghost of a former who appears at the top of stairs, the ghost of a boy who has been seen in the upstairs back dining room, and the spirit of a boy in riding clothes who is seen downstairs. The attic door is said to open and close on its own.

Source: My Haunted Salem


Posted in My Haunted Salem and tagged by with no comments yet.

Spirit at Searcy State Hospital   Uploader Writes  “Location:…

by cnkguy
Spirit at Searcy State Hospital   Uploader Writes  “Location:…

Spirit at Searcy State Hospital   

Uploader Writes  

“Location: Closed Ward Bldg. condemned and sealed up from the public. Searcy State Hospital, Mount Vernon, Alabama.

This photo was taken while I was documenting the historic sites located here. This site originally started as the Mt. Vernon Arsenal in the early 1800’s. At one time the Apache Chef Geronimo was held here before being transferred to Florida.

Once I got home, I was viewing the photos on my computer and when I zoomed in I saw what appears to be a face looking out of the window. The area in question is the lower floor window between the two left columns in the upper left window panes. I have showed this to several others and they saw the same thing without my prompting what to look for. No items are behind the glass and there are no reflections cast onto the glass that I could tell.

Source: My Haunted Salem


Posted in My Haunted Salem and tagged by with no comments yet.

Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours. … Wish you a very…

by cnkguy
Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours. … Wish you a very…

Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours. … Wish you a very happy and blessed Thanksgiving! Wishing you the gift of faith and the blessing of hope this thanksgiving day! We gather on this day to be thankful for what we have, for the family we love, the friends we cherish, and for the blessings that will come.

Source: My Haunted Salem


Posted in My Haunted Salem and tagged by with no comments yet.

Brecon and Radnor Lunatic AsylumAdam Smith took this intriguing…

by cnkguy
Brecon and Radnor Lunatic AsylumAdam Smith took this intriguing…

Brecon and Radnor Lunatic Asylum

Adam Smith took this intriguing photo of the abandoned Brecon and Radnor Lunatic Asylum, Wales whilst on a walk.

There appears to be a face at the first floor window of the facility that used to house psychiatric patients, and which was also a prisoner of war camp for German soldiers during World War Two. The site was closed in 1999.

Smith said he has been asked to remove the photo from the web after hundreds of people have since turned up at the asylum to hunt the ghost down.

Source: My Haunted Salem


Posted in My Haunted Salem and tagged by with no comments yet.

The Chatham Manor’s Lady in WhiteThe Chatham Manor was a…

by cnkguy
The Chatham Manor’s Lady in WhiteThe Chatham Manor was a…

The Chatham Manor’s Lady in White

The Chatham Manor was a thriving plantation overlooking the Rappahannock River in Fredericksburg, Virginia. Construction was started in 1768 by William Fitzhugh and upon its completion the 1,280 acre estate included a dairy, ice house, barns, stables, a fish hatchery, an orchard, mill and a race track which Fitzhugh would pit his horses against other planters horses in the surrounding area. The house was named after the Earl of Chatham, William Pitt, a good friend of William’s.

The Chatham Manor was well known for its elaborate parties and despite the success of the plantation, the parties and entertaining put a financial strain on Fitzhugh and in 1796, he left Chatham and in 1806 he sold it to Major Churchill Jones for $20,000. It stayed in the Jones family for the next 66 years. Over the years Chatham had 15 different owners and the last one, John Lee Pratt left the plantation to the National Park Service which took possession of the plantation in 1975.

Chatham had many famed visitors over the years and it is somewhat interesting how they intertwine through history. One of the visitors was George Washington who lived only a few hundred yards away. Washington and Fitzhugh were friends and Molly Fitzhugh, William’s daughter, married George Washington Parke Custis (Washington’s step grandson). Their daughter, Mary, married Robert E. Lee. There are many tales the Lee courted Mary at Chatham but the Park Service said that there is no evidence to support that claim.

There are probably several reasons why the Chatham house could be haunted. In 1805 a group of slaves rebelled at the plantation. During the rebellion the overseer and 4 other people were overpowered and whipped. It took an armed posse to put down the rebellion and punished those involved, in total one man was executed, two died while escaping and two were deported.

During the Civil War and the battle of Fredericksburg, the Union army used Chatham as their headquarters and after the fighting started and the Union was defeated, Chatham was used as a hospital for the many wounded Union soldiers. 130 soldiers died at Chatham and were buried on the grounds. It wasn’t until after the war that the bodies were dug up and re-buried at the Fredericksburg National Cemetery.

Interestingly though, these are not the reason that Chatham is considered haunted. The reason is forbidden love. An English girl had fallen in love with and English dry-salter and her father refused to let her daughter marry a commoner. He sent her to Chatham in hopes of marrying her to someone he thought was up to their social standards.

Her true loved followed her to America and after meeting secretly decided to elope. They planned on using one of the many social events at Chatham to mask her departure and she would use a rope ladder to climb down to the river and they would boat away. Unfortunately, their plan was overheard by a servant of George Washington who was attending the event.

She told Washington of the plan and when the young girl climbed down the rope, she fell into the arms of George Washington who had the English suitor arrested and the young girl shipped back to England. No one knows what happen to the young man but the girl married in England and had 10 kids but is rumored to have never smiled again after that evening.

She vowed on her death bed to return to the only place she was truly happy and that ended up being Chatham Manor. The apparition of the young lady, called the Lady in White, is seen once every 7 years on the anniversary of her death, she walks the path that leads to the river assuming to search for her true love. Today it is known as the ghost walk and she began appearing there from the day of her death in June 21st, 1790.

Source: My Haunted Salem


Posted in My Haunted Salem and tagged by with no comments yet.

The Olivier House GhostThe Olivier House Hotel in New Orleans…

by cnkguy
The Olivier House GhostThe Olivier House Hotel in New Orleans…

The Olivier House Ghost

The Olivier House Hotel in New Orleans has a long history, beginning 1838, when widow Madame Marie Anne Bievenu Olivier had it built. Construction finished in 1839, when she moved into the house, located on Toulouse Street. Madame Olivier was born in 1772, and witnessed a lot of tragedy in the city of New Orleans, including the fires of 1788 and 1794.

When she was 16, she married Nicolas Godefroy Olivier, distinguished painter. The two would go on to have nine children and many grandchildren. New Orleans began rebuilding itself in the 1830s. Cotton was thriving, and the Olivier family was one of the wealthiest in the city. After her husband passed away, Madame Olivier decided to build a new house at the property she owned at Toulouse Street.

The home was built right in the French Quarter, about half a block off Bourbon Street. It was close enough to the action, yet far away enough for peace and quiet from the sights and sounds. In the original design, there was a business establishment on the first floor. The front of the home was designed with tall arches. At one point in time, there was a ballroom on the top floor.

After Marie Anne passed away in 1843, the property passed into the hands of Felix Labatut, and then onto Ms. Elizabeth Locoul. It survived being desecrated by Union soldiers during the Civil War. Ms. Locoul moved back in after the war and continued living in the house until she passed away in 1895. It has passed through many owners since. In the 1950s, an investment group from Texas bought the house with the intention of demolishing it in order to make room for a parking lot, but luckily, local residents managed to save it. In the 1970s, new owners got a hold of the house, and spent nearly a million dollars to restore it to its formal glory.

Today, the Olivier House is a hotel. It’s been renovated and fixed up with modern amenities. Each room has its very own theme and unique charm. Period antiques are a large part of the interior décor.

It’s also believed, by some, that former owners never left the Olivier House. Ms. Locoul in particular is still believed to live in the house. Perhaps she lived there so long in life that she didn’t want to leave it in death. Guests of the Olivier House have claimed to see Elizabeth over the years.

Source: My Haunted Salem


Posted in My Haunted Salem and tagged by with no comments yet.