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7 Haunted Places in Wyoming

by cnkguy
7 Haunted Places in Wyoming

Wyoming is renowned for its wild beauty and rugged train. It’s also home to a host of spirits. From a entombed laborer to a headless bride, here are seven of The Cowboy State’s most infamous ghosts.

Old Faithful Inn – Yellowstone National Park

A number of chilling tales surround Yellowstone’s Old Faithful Inn, but the most famous involves a headless bride who lingers in the crow’s nest.

The story goes that in 1915 a rich young woman rebelled against her parents and married a household servant. The newlyweds traveled to Old Faithful Inn for their honeymoon, but quarreled repeatedly over money. After an especially loud fight, the new groom stormed out of the hotel and was never seen again. When staff went to check on the bride, they found her headless body in the bathtub. Days later, a foul odor led to the woman’s head in the crow’s nest.

Now, the headless bride roams the hotel’s upper reaches in a white dress, sobbing and cradling her bloodied head. Some think she’s searching for the man who betrayed her. Others think she’s out for revenge.

St. Mark’s Episcopal Church – Cheyenne

Built in the late 1800s, St. Mark’s is a historic church in Wyoming’s capital city. It’s also the site of a chilling tale.

According to local legend, two mason workers traveled from Sweden to complete the bell tower. Strangely, the men disappeared before the project was complete. Puzzled and annoyed, church officials hired replacements, and the men were unnerved to hearing banging and whispering coming from inside the tower walls.

Years later, an unnamed man came forward and claimed that one of the Swedish laborer had fallen to his death while working on the church. Terrified, the other laborer entombed his fallen friend in the tower wall and fled town.

Today, stories of ghostly whispers and clanging bells surround the old church. Tales posted online claim that discordant organ notes ring throughout the tower, though officials removed the instrument long ago.

Heart Mountain Relocation Center – Powell

After the 1941 bombing of Pearl Harbor, the U.S. government forced more than 100,000 Japanese Americans to live in internment camps. One of these camps was Wyoming’s Heart Mountain Relocation Center, and nearly 14,000 passed people through the facility during its three years of operation. The center closed in 1945.

Today, Heart Mountain is a museum with a haunted reputation. Legend has it a friendly spirit follows visitors during the day. At night, shadows roam the grounds. Around 180 people died at the relocation center. Perhaps the spirits just want to return home.

Wyoming Frontier Prison – Rawlins

For 80 years, the Wyoming Frontier Prison housed some of the state’s most notorious criminals, including a woman who poisoned who her father’s pie and a train robber known as the gentleman bandit. Hundreds of inmates died at the old prison, and rumor has it many of them are still around.

Paranormal activity at the former jail includes strange lights, disembodied voices, and shadowy figures. The Ghost Adventures crew explored the site in 2013 and encountered everything from mysterious balls of light to an apparition in an old cell block.

Sweetwater County Library – Casper

Casper’s Sweetwater County Library sits atop a former graveyard dating back to the 1860s. Most of the graves were relocated long before the library opened in 1980. However, human remains, and even a coffin, have turned up, indicating not all of the graves made the move. Are the abandoned occupants responsible for the strange activity at the library?

Eerie events at Sweetwater include lights that switch on and off, doors that slam close, and whispers from empty rooms. The spirits’ favorite trick, however, is typing staff members’ names on typewriters, computers, or whatever technology is available. The paranormal activity is so prevalent, the library keeps a ghost log so patrons and staff can chronicle their spooky experiences.

Historic Occidental Hotel – Buffalo

Founded in 1880, Occidental Hotel has housed a number of famous (and infamous) guests, including Teddy Roosevelt and Butch Cassidy. Now, the historic hotel is reportedly home to Emily, a long-dead child that refuses to leave.

Though there’s no historical record of Emily, legend has it she was the daughter of a prostitute and died from cholera. Today, the spunky spirit enjoys playing pranks and spends her afterlife tapping on visitors’ shoulders or tugging at their clothing. At times, she appears in the Bordello Suite, startling guests by appearing at the foot of the bed.

Platte River

Since 1862, residents near the Platte River have spotted a phantom vessel known as The Ship of Death. Those who’ve seen it wished they hadn’t.

Legend has it, a white mist forms on the river then thickens to fog before an eerie gray ship emerges from its depths. Terrified witnesses report seeing a ghostly crew manning the vessel, and to their horror, a loved one laying silently on deck. In the first Death Ship sighting, it was a fiance. In another, a good friend. No matter the relationship, The Ship of Death is so named because the loved one spotted aboard dies a day or two later.

Know of a haunted place in Wyoming? Submit your tips here!

Source:

TRUE GHOST STORIES

Ghost and Ghouls


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Ghost Photo: The Nurse

by cnkguy
Ghost Photo: The Nurse

Taken at the abandoned St. Crispin’s Hospital in Northhampton, England, this photo appears to show a black-clad figure leaning out a window. Is it a ghost?

According to the photographer, the upper floors at St. Crispin’s are burned out or missing, making it nearly impossible to access the window pictured.

“The windows shown consist of no glass or plastic sheeting on the upper floors, they are either boarded up or a gaping maw,” the OP writes. “I am not saying it is anything supernatural, but considering the building’s age and history, this image looks remarkably like a Victorian lady with a ruffled shawl over her shoulders.”

Established in 1876, St. Crispin’s was a psychiatric hospital that once housed hundreds of men, women, and children. What do you think of the strange image?

Source:

TRUE GHOST STORIES

Ghost and Ghouls


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Ghost Photo: Lemp Mansion Spirit

by cnkguy
Ghost Photo: Lemp Mansion Spirit

A St. Louis paranormal research group believes the photo above shows a ghostly woman at the infamous Lemp Mansion. Do you think they’re right?

On March 27, the group posted the following on Facebook.

The Lemp family made their fortune in beer, dominating the St. Louis beer market with the Lemp Brewery and Falstaff brand beer. However, depression plagued the prominent family, and three Lemps committed suicide in the family home between 1904 and 1949. A fourth Lemp shot herself in a separate residence.

Today, the Lemp Mansion is a restaurant and inn, not to mention one of America’s most haunted homes. Tales of ghostly knocks, phantom footsteps, disembodied voices, and sightings of a deformed spirit in the attic are just a few of the strange events said to occur at the historic property.

Have you captured a ghost on camera? Send your photos to ghostsghoul@gmail.com.

Source:

TRUE GHOST STORIES

Ghost and Ghouls


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Ghost Photo: Alcatraz Spirit?

by cnkguy
Ghost Photo: Alcatraz Spirit?

A reader writes: “This is a picture my son took with his phone while we were at Alcatraz. This is one of the sections that was closed off to the public. The first is the original. Second is zoomed in. Please let me know what you think.”

Located on a small island in San Francisco Bay, Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary was one of the world’s most notorious prisons and housed ruthless criminals like Al Capone, George “Machine Gun Kelly,” and Robert Franklin Stroud. The prison closed in 1963 and is today a popular tourist attraction managed by the National Park Service. It’s also rumored to be one of the most haunted places in America.

What do you make of the photo? Ghost or park employee?

Send your creepy ghost photos to ghostsghoul@gmail.com!

Source:

TRUE GHOST STORIES

Ghost and Ghouls


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The Ghost of Dead Woman’s Crossing

by cnkguy
The Ghost of Dead Woman’s Crossing

In 1905, a young mother named Katie DeWitt James filed for divorce and boarded a train in Custer City, Oklahoma. She brought along her infant daughter with plans to visit her cousin across the state. The two never made it. For reasons unknown, Katie disembarked with a stranger and met an untimely end on a wagon crossing. Now her tortured spirit reportedly haunts the site of her death near Weatherford, Oklahoma.

The Crossing

Katie filed for divorce on July 6, 1905 and boarded the train with her daughter the next day. Her father, Henry, saw them off and all seemed well for awhile. However, Henry grew concerned when he didn’t hear from Katie after a few weeks and eventually hired a private detective to locate her.

The detective soon learned that Katie had gotten off the train at Weatherford rather than her intended destination. Witnesses saw her leaving in a wagon with a woman named Fannie Norton, a known prostitute who was also rumored to have killed a bartender. Some time later an agitated Fannie returned with Katie’s baby and handed the child to a farmer’s son before galloping away. The child was wrapped in a bloody dress, and Fannie’s wagon was also spattered with blood.

When authorities tracked Fannie down, she denied killing Katie and poisoned herself soon after questioning. A month later, a fisherman stumbled upon Katie’s remains along a creek near Weatherford. He found her beneath a wooden wagon crossing, a bullet lodged in her skull.

A heartbroken Henry interred Katie in Weatherford’s Greenwood Cemetery. An inscription on her tombstone reads: “How Many Hopes He Ended Here.” Katie’s daughter Lulu Belle returned to her father Martin but died when she was just eight years old.

The Dead Woman

According to local legend, Katie haunts the site of her murder. The old wagon crossing is long gone, but a concrete bridge was built nearby and it’s here where Katie roams. Locals call the bridge Dead Woman’s Crossing.

Eerie events at the bridge include dancing blue lights and the sound of creaky wagon wheels. Some visitors hear blood-curdling screams. Others hear an anguished woman calling out for her child. Those who dare walk along the creek at night may encounter the murdered woman’s spirit roaming the banks.

Unlike many legends, the history behind Dead Woman’s Crossing is undeniably true, whether or not the haunting is. Do you think Katie’s ghost roams the site of her murder? Or is the story nothing more than a chilling myth?

Source:

TRUE GHOST STORIES

Ghost and Ghouls


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True Ghost Story: The Petersborough Poltergeist

by cnkguy
True Ghost Story: The Petersborough Poltergeist

The following story appeared in the Eugene Register Guard on March 4, 1892

“The people of Petersborough, Minnesota are greatly disturbed over a haunted house, which is said to be in the heart of the city. Some months ago, a man named Howard rented a house on the principal street of the town. It was a small frame house and had been constantly occupied. Ever since going into the house, they had been subjected to the most extraordinary experiences, and at last, became so terrified that they left the house.

For some time, they supposed they were the victims of practical jokers, but all attempts to catch them failed, and even the neighbors, called in to help discover the cause of the strange noises, were unable to find what was wrong.

While the residents were in bed, an invisible hand would jerk the bed clothes from them, and then the door would slam and heavy steps would be heard across the floor. All efforts to find whence the noise came were unavailing. On another occasion, a door was broken while the whole family was sitting in the room.

The most terrifying manifestations were the unearthly noises which accompanied them. Those noises varied from the sound made by the crashing of a table full of dishes to that which would be made by a wall falling down in a room.

Notwithstanding the noise, there never was anything disturbed in the house. The manifestations were almost invariably preceded by a loud humming sound which gradually become louder until it culminated in an awful crashing and rumbling, which made the hair of the listeners stand on end. Not less than 15 people were ready to swear that they had heard these manifestations and are convinced the place is haunted.”

Source:

TRUE GHOST STORIES

Ghost and Ghouls


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