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slightly-awkward-sunshine:I made this a long time ago and was…

by cnkguy
slightly-awkward-sunshine:I made this a long time ago and was…

slightly-awkward-sunshine:

I made this a long time ago and was very nervous about posting it to Tumblr. I can’t really think of a good caption~ everything I wanted to say is in the little blurb at the beginning. 

‘God of Arepo’ Fan-made graphic novel 

Part 1 // Part 2 // Part 3 // Read the Original Story Here

Source: Tales of Necromancy


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Thank you so much to Billy Hawkins (Twitter: @nc_hawk) for…

by cnkguy
Thank you so much to Billy Hawkins (Twitter: @nc_hawk) for…

Thank you so much to Billy Hawkins (Twitter: @nc_hawk) for submitting this #paranormal experience report to my #haunted #NorthCarolina page this morning!! It’s folks like you submitting stories and evidence that really make GhostQuest.net an awesome resource for investigators!! 👻

Source: Ghost Quest USA


Posted in Ghost Quest USA and tagged by with no comments yet.

lailoken:“An alternative initiation rite into the witch cult was known at Llandwei Brefi in…

by cnkguy
lailoken:“An alternative initiation rite into the witch cult was known at Llandwei Brefi in…

lailoken:

“An alternative initiation rite into the witch cult was known at Llandwei Brefi in Carmarthenshire in the 19th century. Prospective witches would attend Mass on a Sunday at their local church The would secret the consecrated host in their mouths instead of su lowing it. Once safely outside the church, they walked widdershine (anti-clockwise) around the graveyard nine times. Nine is an important number in magical belief, and associated with the occult power of the moon. The would-be witch then fed the host to a large toad or a black dog waiting at the boundary of the churchyard at the lych-gate. This animal was said to be the Old Lad or the Devil himself in animal guise. Sometimes the witch kissed the toad and this may be a cryptic reference to the use of the so-called ‘sacred mushroom’, usually the red-topped and white spotted Fly Agaric toadstool (Amanita muscaria), or the Liberty Cap (Psilocybe semilanceolata), which grows on hillsides and moorland in Wales. These fungi were likely used to attain a trance state and contact with the spirit world. One south Pembrokeshire witch who was supposed to have per- formed this initiation rite was Moll of Redberth who lived at Carew in the 19th century. There were many rumours that she was a practitioner of the Black Arts and on her deathbed she finally confessed to the vicar. Moll told him that when she had attended her first communion as a young girl she had not eaten the wafer, but had hidden it in her hand. On the way home she met a black dog on the road and had fed him the host saying:

‘I thus give the Devil the body of the Lord that I may become a witch.’”

Welsh Witches and Wizards,

Witchcraft of the British Isles — Book I

by Michael Howard

Source: Tales of Necromancy


Posted in Tales of Necromancy and tagged by with no comments yet.