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ashes-0f-phoenix: suicientist: No offense but *coughs into a white cloth, then dramatically unfolds…

by cnkguy
ashes-0f-phoenix: suicientist: No offense but *coughs into a white cloth, then dramatically unfolds…

ashes-0f-phoenix:

suicientist:

No offense but *coughs into a white cloth, then dramatically unfolds it to reveal that it is spotted with blood, foreshadowing my tragic death by tuberculosis at the ending of the film*

@talesofnecromancy

I am personally offended by the unreasonable amount of people I know who’ve had TB (yes, in this day and age) when I’ve wanted it since I was 15 and not one of them gave it to me – not even my ghost. Mean. 

Source: Tales of Necromancy


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The strange true story of Jacob Ong, and his hat!Ong’s Hut (also…

by cnkguy
The strange true story of Jacob Ong, and his hat!Ong’s Hut (also…

The strange true story of Jacob Ong, and his hat!

Ong’s Hut (also Ong, Ong’s Hat) is an old ghost town in Pemberton Township, Burlington County, New Jersey.

Although it is now not much more than one ruined hut (“Ong’s Hut”) the town still appears on some maps.

The story of Ong’s Hat begins long before the birth of a nation. On February 5, 1631 the ship Lyon arrived in Boston Harbor from Bristol, England. The settlers on board included Francis Ong, of Suffolk County, England; his wife Francis; and children Simon, Jacob, and Isaac.

Local history records show the Ong family settled in the nearby area of Pine Barrens around about 1750, the head of the family by then being one Jacob Ong. This map from 1770 clearly shows the settlement of Ong.

One story of the origin of the town name is that at the town dance, a member of the Ong family dropped his hat, a jealous member of the town folk then stomped on it, ruining it, and in frustration Ong tossed it in the air, where it caught on a high branch of a pine tree. The hat remained there for many years, serving as landmark which identified the small village.

Not much is known from 1770 – 1860,

A hundred years latter, In 1860’s Ong’s Hat was a lively town which served as a social center for the surrounding area. It was known for the availability of alcohol, prizefighting, and fortune telling ladies. Local legend claims that Jacobs wife, Elisa was gifted at “fortelling the future” and after her death in the early 1800’s, her descendants turned to fortune telling to keep up the family traditions.

Strange events started to occur in the town from around 1884, and by 1930s, the city had become a ghost town, as the local residents either “vanished into thin air” or got driven out of town by the strange events.

These events and stories include :

One of the earliest UFO reports ever recorded was in Pine Barrens, at the time Jacob Ong was living nearby.

Jacob Ong was reported to be seen in the local Tavern, years after his death – claiming he never died, “just missed some years mam” he is quoted as saying.

The alleged discovery of a silver egg shaped pod in 1897, which was said to “suck” in people, never to return.

Little Egg Harbor, was claimed to also hold a similar silver egg pod in the early 1750’s

Stories from 1890’s report locals claimed the eggs allowed people to travel back and forth in time or dimensions.

About 1917, a pine hawker named John Zimbacke and his wife mysteriously disappeared from their small cabin.

In 1925 Farmer Ellwood Anderson was driving from Mount Holly to his home when he found the bodies of two men slumped dead in a car, in the dimly lit woods, he saw another dead body.
Edit

Source: My Haunted Salem


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Marshall Mansion Haunted House on a HillNot much is known about…

by cnkguy
Marshall Mansion Haunted House on a HillNot much is known about…

Marshall Mansion 
Haunted House on a Hill

Not much is known about General Elisha Marshall and his second wife Janet Marshall Rutherford before they moved into their great Victorian mansion in Palmerton, PA. Marshall was a somewhat famous Union soldier in the Civil War, and Rutherford was a daughter of the prominent Rutherford family. No mention of their marriage was ever recorded, even in Marshall’s obituary, and the two lived in almost total isolation for the remainder of their lives.

Marshall commissioned his now infamous mansion to be built in 1881, atop a red shale hill in Palmerton, which has always been barren save a few small trees. The mansion overlooked the nearby paint ore mines that Rutherford’s family owned in the area. Today, the mansion overlooks the mine ruins and Route 248, from where the house can be easily viewed as you’re driving past. Over the years, the surrounding hills have grown lush with greenery after decades of pollution from the mine. Still, Marshall’s Mansion sits alone atop its red rock hill.

Marshall didn’t get to enjoy his odd creation for very long; he died in 1883. It was at this point that rumors began to swirl around his widow. Rutherford lived in complete seclusion on the hill. She closed and barred all the windows, and kept angry guard dogs around the house. No guests were welcome unless they had been very close friends with Rutherford. Her mail and supplies were delivered to her by the caretaker, Truxton Griffin. She almost never went into town, and closed her home for good after she was diagnosed with cancer in 1911, dying a short time after.

Several legends surround the home thanks to the strange behavior of Marshall and his hermit-like wife. People used to spread the tale that Rutherford murdered her husband and hid his body in secret slave tunnels below the house. She felt guilt for the rest of her life and so never left the home. Marshall actually died of Civil War injuries, having spent the majority of his life in constant pain from shell fragments still lodged in his body. He is buried in Rochester, New York. However, his body was disturbed by grave robbers in 2000, and his skull was stolen and the rest of his remains were thrown about the grave site. The groundskeeper and several investigators believed the head was taken for a satanic ritual, and the perpetrators have yet to be caught.

Some say Marshall’s Hill is cursed, because while many attempts have been made, barely anything will grow there. Further legends say the hill is red from Marshall’s blood. For decades, children would dare each other to visit this haunted house on a hill. The house was renovated in 1987 and is now a private residence.

Source: My Haunted Salem


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rainywaywitch:My witchy resolution for 2020

by cnkguy
rainywaywitch:My witchy resolution for 2020

rainywaywitch:

My witchy resolution for 2020

Source: Tales of Necromancy


Posted in Tales of Necromancy and tagged by with no comments yet.